New Mexico’s Future is Female

NEW MEXICO – In a trend that was seen across the nation, many political seats in our Land of Enchantment have also been replaced by female leaders.

Beginning with the “biggest chair of them all,” our state’s governor chair will stay at the hands of a Hispanic female, only this time party lines have changed. Susana Martinez, a republican, made history when in 2010 she became not only our state’s first female governor, but pioneered by becoming our nation’s first ever Hispanic female elected governor.

Now, that momentum continues as Michelle Lujan Grisham, a democrat, becomes our state’s second female Hispanic woman to lead our great state, and pioneers in becoming our nation’s first democratic Hispanic female governor.

In Congress, New Mexico representation is now majority female. With Democrat Xochitl Torres small replacing Republican Steve Pearce as representative of our state’s second congressional district. In a race that has made national headlines, Torres small has now become not only the first female representative for the district, but is also the first Hispanic person to hold the seat. Even before a winner was announced, the district race was already set to make history by having both candidates be females.

In the race to represent our first congressional district in Congress, history was also made. Although the office was already previously held by a female, our now Governor-elect Michelle Lujan-Grisham, for the first time in history our state will have a Native American female representative in the house. Even more historic, congresswoman-elect Deb Haaland is joined by Sharice Davids as the two first Native American females ever to serve in the house.

This blue female wave can also be seen in our state politics. Our state Legislature continues to have a majority of male representatives but only by four seats. Starting this January our 70-seat House will have 31 female representatives. According to the Albuquerque Journal, 10 years ago the House only had 23 female representatives and mentioned that in 1973, there weren’t any at all.

“I’ve been around that (Capitol) enough to know that women aren’t always seen and heard and respected in the ways that they deserve,” Micaela Lara Cadena told the Journal. Cadena emerged as the winner and will now represent New Mexico’s 33rd district.

There is no doubt that this blue female wave of politicians running and being elected into office resembles a cry from our nation’s people to see a change in the political power ruling our country. Since the election of Donald Trump, we have seen the male dominated Republican party not only nationwide, but locally succumb to our nation’s top leader’s racist and xenophobic agenda.

As a border state, it is vital to stray away from Trump’s hate-driven political actions given that we are the ones who see and live the consequences day to day, unlike him who has yet visit New Mexico since he became president.

The hope for this blue female wave of politicians is that they will bring the change that so much of the nation craves, the same craving that put them in the seats they will soon represent.